Sunday, July 20, 2014

Chorizo & Calamari Salad with Black Olives & Pomegranate

Chorizo & Calamari Salad with Black Olives & Pomegranate 2

On a stormy night a couple of weeks ago a friend and I ventured out to dinner at The Boat Shed, an iconic Nelson restaurant, perched on the edge of the harbour. We decided to Trust The Chef, and as we oooohed and aaaaahed and OMGd our way through the following six or seven dishes, my mind was somewhat relieved from worrying about the rain which was bucketing in through my dining room ceiling back home.  A couple of hours in a "dry place" savouring some heavenly food was just the distraction I needed.

One dish that really delighted us both, and which has been on my mind ever since, was a zingy squid, chorizo and chilli salad.  It reminded me a little of a seafood, fennel and lime salad from Ottolenghi The Cookbook that I'd had bookmarked for ages.

Since it's Pot Luck week this week at I Heart Cooking Clubs, it seemed like a good time to spend a little time with Ottolenghi and conjure up my own version of this salad, which is a little bit Ottolenghi and a little bit Boat Shed.

This made a great dish for a light lunch.  It was quick and simple to put together, and is definitely a dish I will be making again.  Had it been a nice sunny day, this would have been lovely to enjoy al fresco, but on a wintery Sunday warmed by the heat pump it still brought back memories of squid salads in the Greek islands.

Chorizo & Calamari Salad with Black Olives & Pomegranate 1

Chorizo & Calamari Salad with Black Olives & Pomegranate Recipe
Inspired by The Boat Shed and Yotam Ottolenghi
Serves 2
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

2 small fennel bulbs
generous handful of coriander
1x mild red chilli, deseeded & finely sliced
handful of black olives
extra virgin olive oil
freshly squeezed lemon juice
flaky sea salt
1x chorizo sausage, thinly sliced
400g (14 oz) cleaned calamari tubes
pomegranate seeds to finish

Trim the bases and tops off the fennel bulbs, reserving a few of the feathery fronds.  Cut the fennel in half lengthwise, and then slice them as thinly as you can - a mandolin is the ideal tool if you have one - and place in a large bowl.  Finely chop the reserved fennel fronds and add them to the bowl.  Add the roughly chopped coriander, chilli and black olives.  Drizzle over extra virgin olive oil and lemon juice to taste, and season with a little flaky sea salt, again to taste.  Set aside.

Heat a little olive oil (you won't need much) in a small pan over medium heat, and saute the chorizo sausage until browned on both sides.  Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, cut the calamari tubes into pieces about 5cm (2 inches) square, and score lightly with a sharp knife.  Toss with a little olive oil and a generous pinch of flaky sea salt.  Heat a chargrill pan over high heat (cast iron is perfect for the job) until smoking.  Grill the calamari in small batches until just done - about 1 minute on each side.  Remove from heat.

Add the calamari and chorizo to the salad.  Toss until well combined and serve immediately, garnished with a sprinkling of pomegranate seeds.

If you would like to get to know Yotam Ottolenghi a little better or any one of our other IHCC chefs, then do go and visit my friends at I Heart Cooking Clubs and see what they've all cooked up for Pot Luck week ...

IHCC Ottolenghi Leek Badge resized

... or check out Ottolenghi The Cookbook and Ottolenghi's other great titles available from Amazon USA, Amazon UK or Fishpond NZ.

I'll also be sharing this post at See Ya In the Gumbo hosted by the lovely, and very amusing, Michelle at Ms. enPlace, at Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays hosted by my lovely friend Deb at Kahakai Kitchen, at Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads, and at Foodie Friday hosted by Designs by Gollam.


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Thursday, July 10, 2014

Chocolate, Date & Banana Bread

Chocolate, Date & Banana Bread 2

It's no secret that making ethically responsible choices, as much as possible, about the food that I consume, is a subject which is dear to my heart, and is indeed one of the founding principles of this blog.  As such I regularly use Fair Trade products - they are always exceptionally good quality and Fair Trade principles are consistent with my own food philosophy.  So I was pretty excited a couple of weeks ago then, when a nice big hamper of gorgeous Fair Trade goodies turned up, along with an invitation to bake something delicious and join in this year's "The Big Fair Bake" event.

Trade Aid Goodies

What you don't see in the photo, is a bunch of Fair Trade bananas, which, by the time they had traveled for a couple of days to get to me, were a bit riper than I like to eat them.  So it seemed inevitable that they would be included in my recipe.  I started thinking banana cake, but to be honest I generally prefer banana bread - it usually keeps well for several days, and makes a great snack or breakfast on the run.  Once I got to thinking about adding in some dates and dark chocolate, I knew this would elevate my regular banana bread to something really special.

Chocolate, Date & Banana Bread 1

Chocolate, Date & Banana Bread Recipe
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

1/2 cup coconut oil  
1/2 cup Fair Trade organic cane sugar  
1 teaspoon vanilla extract  
2x eggs  
13/4 cups plain flour  
1 teaspoon baking powder  
1 teaspoon baking soda  
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3x medium-sized All-Good Fair Trade ripe bananas, mashed  
1/3 cup golden syrup
1 cup Trade Aid Medjool dates, finely chopped
80g Fair Trade Whittaker's Dark Ghana chocolate, roughly chopped  

Preheat oven to 160 degrees C (325 degrees F).

Lightly grease a 23cm x 13cm (9" x 5") loaf tin, and line with baking paper.

In a medium sized bowl mix together coconut oil and sugar, then add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.  Stir in the vanilla.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon.  Add to the wet ingredients, and mix until just barely combined.

Add the mashed bananas, golden syrup, dates and chocolate, and once again mix until just combined - take care not to over mix.

Spoon mixture into the prepared tin, and bake for 60-65 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the loaf comes out clean.

Cool in the tin for 20 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack.  Allow to cool completely before slicing.

I will also be submitting this post to Sweet New Zealand.  Inspired by Alessandra Zecchini, and hosted this month by Libby at Ditch The Carbs, Sweet New Zealand is an event for all Kiwi bloggers (whether living at home or abroad), or all foreign bloggers living in New Zealand, to link up their sweet treats.

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Sunday, July 6, 2014

Broad Bean Pesto

Broad Bean Pesto 1

This week at I Heart Cooking Clubs, we're whipping up Starters & Nibbles with Nigel Slater.  I knew immediately what I was going to make.  I had bookmarked Nigel's recipe in Tender Vol. I for "A green hummus" weeks ago, and this seemed like the perfect time to run with it.

I took inspiration from Nigel's recipe, but made a few changes to make more of a pesto out of it.  I didn't have the mint called for in the original recipe, so used parsley instead.  I also added in a bit of garlic, some freshly grated parmesan, and some toasted sunflower seeds.

Broad Bean Pesto 3

The resulting pesto was delightfully fresh and "springlike" - quite a joy in the middle of winter.  It makes a great snack or pass around with some raw vegetable sticks, corn chips, or spread on toasted, crusty sourdough bread.  It was also a delicious accompaniment to leftover roast chicken, and tomorrow night it will be turned into sauce for pasta.

This made a great alternative to my regular go-to hummus that I frequently turn to when I have friends around for nibbles, and this will definitely become a regular in my repertoire.

Broad Bean Pesto 2

Broad Bean Pesto Recipe
Inspired by recipe by Nigel Slater
from Tender, Vol. I
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

500g (18 oz) frozen broad beans
(if you're lucky enough to have fresh broad beans, even better)
large handful flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
1 cup freshly grated parmesan
1/2 cup toasted sunflower seeds
extra virgin olive oil
juice of half a lemon
flaky sea salt & freshly ground black pepper

Bring a medium sized pot of water to the boil.  Add broad beans to the pot, return to boiling, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes.  (If you're using fresh broad beans, you will probably need to boil for a few more minutes.)  Drain, and refresh immediately in cold water.  Once beans are cooled, remove and discard the thick outer skins from the beans.

Place beans, parsley and garlic in food processor and blitz to a coarse paste.  Add parmesan and sunflower seeds, and blitz again.  Then with motor running, pour in extra virgin olive oil in a steady stream until you have a smooth paste consistency.

Remove from food processor, and stir in lemon juice, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

If you would like to get to know Nigel Slater a little better, and to see what everyone else has cooked up this week, then do go and visit my friends at I Heart Cooking Clubs and check out the links ...


... or check out Tender, Vol. 1 and Nigel's many other great titles available from Amazon USA, Amazon UK, or Fishpond NZ.

I'll also be sharing this post this week at See Ya In the Gumbo hosted by the delightful Michelle at Ms. enPlace, at Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads, and at Foodie Fridays hosted by Designs by Gollum.

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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Broad Bean Frittata

Broad Bean Frittata

This week at I Heart Cooking Clubs our theme is Mediterranean Magic.  Now I don't know what springs to mind for you when you think "Mediterranean magic", but I imagine that your vision is probably not too dissimilar from mine.  I picture places like this ...

Paros 47

... and food like this ...

Watermelon & Feta Salad 2

Instead, my reality this week has been winter woollies, root veggies and hearty soups, and a severe storm that left me spending several hours trying to mop up the flood.  In short, life this week (distance from the Mediterranean aside) has been about as unmagical as it could get.

So getting in the spirit of this theme has been a bit challenging.  I was pretty much going to forget about the theme, make a comforting bowl of soup and call it a day.  Until thumbing through Nigel Slater's Tender, Vol I, I came across his Broad Bean Frittata.  Eggs are great for a quick and simple meal when you're low on energy and enthusiasm.  Frittata is Italian, and therefore Mediterranean, and there is something about a perfectly cooked, golden frittata that evokes sunshine.  And even though broad beans at this time of year in my world come out of a freezer bag, they still make me think of summer.

Frittata is not one of those things that really needs a recipe and, to be honest I didn't even actually read Nigel's recipe.  I just read the title and ran with it in the same way that I usually make frittata.  This is what I did, for two generous servings.  This is delicious straight out of the pan - of course it is, but I also love it cold the next day with fresh ciabatta bread as a kind of frittata sandwich.

Broad Bean Frittata Recipe
Inspired by recipe from Nigel Slater
from Tender, Vol. I
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

250g (9 oz) frozen broad beans
4x large free range eggs
very generous handful parsley, finely chopped
flaky sea salt & freshly ground pepper
2x large handfuls of parmesan, freshly grated
(feta would also be a great alternative)
large knob of butter

Bring a small pot of water to the boil.  Add broad beans to the water, return to the boil and cook for 1 minute.  Drain and refresh under cold water.  Remove and discard thick skins from the beans and set aside.

In a small bowl lightly whisk the eggs.  Add the parsley and season liberally with salt and pepper.  Add half the grated parmesan, and whisk just until everything is combined.  Stir in the broad beans.

Add butter to a 24 cm (9 inch) non-stick skillet and set over a medium heat.  Once butter is melted and sizzling, pour egg and bean mixture into the pan.  Turn heat down to low and cook until the eggs have thickened and set, the bottom is cooked and golden, and just the surface is still a little runny.

Sprinkle the rest of the parmesan over the surface.  Grind over a little more black pepper.  Remove pan from the heat and finish under the grill (broiler) in your oven, until puffed and lightly golden on top.  This will only take a few minutes.

Remove from the oven, slide the frittata out onto a board or serving platter, and cut into wedges to serve.

If you would like to get to know Nigel Slater a little better, and to see what everyone else has cooked up this week, then do go and visit my friends at I Heart Cooking Clubs and check out the links ...


... or check out Tender, Vol. 1 and Nigel's many other great titles available from Amazon USA, Amazon UK, or Fishpond NZ.

I'll also be sharing this post this week at See Ya In the Gumbo hosted by the delightful Michelle at Ms. enPlace, at Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads, and at Foodie Fridays hosted by Designs by Gollum.

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Monday, June 23, 2014

Cinnamon Walnut Coffee Cake

Cinnamon Walnut Coffee Cake 1

It's Secret Recipe Club time again, and this month I was assigned to Rebkah's delightful blog Making Miracles.  And Rebekah does indeed make miracles.  Rebekah began her blog several years ago to share her experiences through surrogacy, a journey which enabled her to bring four beautiful girls into the world for couples who desparately wanted babies but were unable to do so without help.  If that's not miraculous I don't know what is.  Since then Rebekah's blog has continued to share stories of her own son, her day to day family life, and of course recipes from her kitchen.

I found lots of dishes I wanted to make and share with you:  Bacon, Egg & Potato Breakfast Tacos (who wouldn't want to start the day with those);  as a salmon addict, I cant wait to try this Molasses Glazed Salmon;  the Shrimp Lemon Pepper Linguine is totally my kind of dish;  and I've lost count of the number of times I've made these insanely good Roasted Brussels Sprouts in the last month.  But feeling, as I did, the need for cake today, it was Rebekah's Cinnamon Coffee Cake that won out.

Cinnamon Walnut Coffee Cake 2

Rebekah adapted this recipe from another source, and I too made a few minor changes.  Like Rebekah, I halved the recipe.  I used brown sugar instead of white in the topping, and I replaced sour cream in the recipe with Greek-style natural yoghurt.  Also like Rebekah, I only did two layers to the cake instead of three, because really I'm just a bit lazy and didn't want to be fussing round with it.

This cake turned out to be deliciously moist and flavourful, soft and tender on the inside with a delightfully crunchy exterior.  This was the perfect accompaniment to an afternoon cuppa, and would also be a great cake to take on a picnic.  My only regret ... that I couldn't actually sit down with Rebekah and have a natter about her life and her travels over a good brew and a piece of this cake ... maybe one day.

Cinnamon Walnut Coffee Cake 3

Cinnamon Walnut Coffee Cake Recipe
Adapted from recipe from Making Miracles
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

For filling & topping:
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3/4 cup chopped walnuts

For cake:
1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 eggs
2 cups plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
pinch of salt
1 cup natural Greek-style yoghurt

Preheat oven to 175 degrees C (350 degrees F).  Lightly grease a 20cm (8 inch) springform or loose-bottomed cake tin, and line the base with non-stick baking paper.

Combine filling and topping ingredients together in a small bowl, and set aside.

Cream butter and sugar together in a large mixing bowl until fluffy. Add the vanilla, then add the eggs one at time, beating well after each addition.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Add the dry ingredients alternately with the yoghurt to butter, sugar and egg mixture, beating after each addition just enough to combine.

Spoon half the batter into the prepared cake tin and sprinkle with 1/2 of the filling mixture. Spread with the remaining cake batter, and top with the remaining filling mixture.

Bake in preheated oven for 60 to 70 minutes or until centre is done.

Allow cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before removing and leaving to cool completely on a wire rack.

Hope you enjoy this cake as much as I did, and visit the links below to check out all the other great dishes my Secret Recipe Club friends made.

Secret Recipe Club



Sunday, June 22, 2014

Open Kibbeh

Open Kibbeh 2

This month at Tasting Jerusalem*, we're exploring tahini - a paste made from grinding sesame seeds, which is a key ingredient in many Middle Eastern dishes, most well-known probably being hummus.

In the past, I've made a few dishes using tahini from my favourite cookbook, Yotam Ottolenghi's "Jerusalem" ...

... Braised Eggs with Lamb, Tahini & Sumac (one of my all-time favourite Ottolenghi dishes),

Braised Eggs with Lamb, Tahini & Sumac 1

... Fried Cauliflower with Tahini & Pomegranate,

Fried Cauliflower with Tahini & Pomegranate 2

... Butternut Squash & Tahini Spread,

Butternut Squash & Tahini Spread 2

... and the insanely, insanely, insanely good Hummus Kawarma with Lemon Sauce.

Hummus Kawarma with Lemon Sauce 1

But I was yet to try the Open Kibbeh.  I'd had this one bookmarked for ages, and with this week being Pot Luck week at I Heart Cooking Clubs, it seemed like the ideal opportunity to give this dish a try.  Kibbeh is a Middle Eastern dish, most commonly prepared (as I understand it) as a kind of bulghur wheat croquette, stuffed with minced lamb, and served with a tahini sauce.

In this less conventional version, the kibbeh is prepared more like a kind of savoury "cake".  A base of bulghur wheat, topped with fragrant, spicy lamb, all topped off with a tahini sauce.

Once again, Ottolenghi did not disappoint me.  This was a wonderfully flavourful dish - great for a wintery evening, and would be excellent for a weekend lunch dish as well.  When I was a kid, my grandmother often made an Indian dish of Potato Cutlets - patties made of mashed potato, filled with savoury mince, and then fried until crispy and golden.  The flavours and textures of Ottolenghi's Open Kibbeh filled me with nostalgia, reminding me a great deal of those potato cutlets of my childhood.

I made only very minimal changes to the recipe - I used banana shallots instead of onions, replaced the spices called for in this recipe with some of the baharat spice mixture I made a while back, and cut down the oil a little.

The final dish is best served warm or at room temperature, rather than straight out of the oven - it's also likely to fall to bits if you try to serve it too hot - and in typical Ottolenghi fashion is a triumph of taste and texture.  You can be sure that I will be making this again - I hope you will try it too.

Open Kibbeh 1.jpg

Open Kibbeh Recipe
Adapted from recipe by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi
from Jerusalem, A Cookbook
Serves 4 as a light meal with salad
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

125g (4oz) bulghur wheat
olive oil
1x large banana shallot, finely chopped
2x cloves garlic, crushed
1x green chilli, finely chopped (remove seeds if you don't want the heat)
350g (12 oz) minced lamb
3 teaspoons baharat spice mixture
large handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
large handful fresh parsley, roughly chopped
flaky sea salt & freshly ground black pepper
generous handful of pine nuts
2 tablespoons self raising flour
1 tablespoon of olive oil
2-3 tablespoons tahini paste
juice of half a lemon
warm water
flaky sea salt

To finish:
sumac
fresh parsley, roughly chopped
extra virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 190 degrees C (375 degrees F).  Lightly grease a 20cm springform or loose-bottomed cake tin, and line the base with non-stick baking paper.

Put bulghur wheat in a small bowl, cover with boiling water, and set aside for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile,  heat a little olive oil (about 1 tablespoon) in a large frying pan set over medium heat.  Add chopped shallots, garlic, and chilli to the pan, and saute until softened.  Add the lamb, and continue to saute until the lamb is lightly browned - about 5 minutes.

Stir in the baharat spice, coriander, parsley, about two-thirds of the pine nuts, and a generous pinch each of flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Cook for a couple more minutes.  Remove from heat, taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.

Strain any remaining liquid off the bulghur.  Add the flour, 1 tablespoon of olive oil, and a pinch each of salt and black pepper.  Work with your hands till you have a mixture that is starting to hold together.  Tip the wheat into the prepared cake tin, and press firmly over the base of the tin - I found it easiest to work with slightly wet hands.  Spread the wheat out into an even layer which is quite firmly compacted.  Spread the lamb mixture evenly over the top of the wheat, and again press down quite firmly.

Bake in preheated oven until the lamb is hot and well browned - about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile prepare the tahini sauce.  Mix tahini paste with the lemon juice and a pinch of flaky sea salt.  Then add enough warm water (a little at a time), until you reach a sauce which is thick yet pourable.

Remove the kibbeh from the oven.  Pour tahini sauce evenly over the top, sprinkle with the remaining pine nuts, and return to the oven until the tahini is set and lightly browned and the pine nuts are golden.

Remove from the oven and leave to cool to room temperature before removing from the tin.  To serve, sprinkle over fresh parsley and sumac, and finish with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

If you would like to get to know Yotam Ottolenghi a little better or any one of our other IHCC chefs, then do go and visit my friends at I Heart Cooking Clubs and see what they've all cooked up for Pot Luck week ...

IHCC Ottolenghi Leek Badge resized

... or check out Jerusalem and Ottolenghi's other great titles available from Amazon USA, Amazon UK or Fishpond NZ.

* Have a look also at what my "Tasting Jerusalem" friends have been doing - you'll find plenty of other great uses for the tahini, along with other interesting ingredients as well. (“Tasting Jerusalem is a virtual cooking community exploring the vibrant flavors and cuisine of the Middle East through the lens of “Jerusalem: A Cookbook” by Ottolenghi and Tamimi published by Ten Speed Press. You can follow along and cook with us by subscribing to omgyummy.com, following the hashtag #TastingJrslm on Twitter and Instagram, liking our Facebook page or joining our Google+ Community and finally checking out all of our groups’ dishes on Pinterest.”)

I'll also be sharing this post at See Ya In the Gumbo hosted by the lovely, and very amusing, Michelle at Ms. enPlace, at Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads, and at Foodie Friday hosted by Designs by Gollam.


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Monday, June 16, 2014

Curried Carrot, Lentil & Roasted Tomato Soup

Curried Carrot, Lentil & Roasted Tomato Soup 1.jpg

I have a kind of love/hate relationship with carrots.  When I was a kid, the only way that carrots ever showed up in our house was boiled (most nights), or worse still mashed up with either parsnip or swede.  I hated it, and many a "you're not leaving this table until you've eaten those carrots" war was waged in our house.  Stews too were the cause of great angst for me, as I would pick all the bits of carrot out, and then the battle would begin again.

When the '80s came around and glazed carrots became highly fashionable, I found them slightly more palatable, but they were still not a "first choice" vegetable for me.  It wasn't until I discovered roasted carrots that I found a way in which I could not just "like" carrots but really love them.  I was a little ambivalent about raw carrots too until the fabulous Marcella Hazan introduced me to a wonderful salad of shredded carrot, lemon zest & juice, flaky sea salt, and extra virgin olive oil - incredibly simple but positively sublime.

For all that I've found a few ways to love carrots, I've never been brave enough to try carrot soup.  I've always been pretty sure that I wouldn't really like it - I couldn't believe that it was going to taste any different to just blitzed up boiled carrots, and I would hate that.  But for weeks now I've been finding myself constantly drawn to Nigel Slater's recipe in Tender, Vol. 1 for "A soup the colour of marigolds".  Yes, it's just carrot soup, but it looks stunning in the photo and the title sounds so magical I keep coming back to it.  Talk about being seduced by a good line!  After my friend and IHCC co-host Deb at Kahakai Kitchen made this soup a couple of weeks ago, I knew it was only a matter of time before I had to try it.

When our I Heart Cooking Club theme of Budget Friendly Dishes came up this week, I knew the moment had arrived to put this soup to the test.  Budget friendly cooking to me is all about using ingredients which are fresh and seasonal, and with a big bag of carrots I'd picked up for $2 sitting in my veggie crisper I didn't think things could get much lighter on the pocket than that.  The original recipe also calls for yellow tomatoes.  These are definitely not in season here right now, and even if you could find them they certainly wouldn't be budget friendly.  I did, however, happen to have some tomatoes in the freezer which I had slow-roasted when they were in season.  Even though I expected these to detract somewhat from the beautiful marigold colour of Nigel's soup, it seemed like they would make a very good and thrifty alternative to the yellow tomatoes.  I subbed in some celery in place of onions, and  I also decided to add some red lentils to make this a little more "wintery" and comforting, some curry powder for a little spiciness instead of the more mellow bay leaves suggested by Nigel, and some coconut milk for a touch of luxury in such a parsimonious meal.

The verdict:  This could not taste less like "just a bunch of boiled up carrots".  My carrot soup phobia is over.  This soup is heavenly ... plenty of sweetness from the carrots, balanced out by the roasted tomatoes, some earthiness and "comfort" from the lentils, sweetness and fragrance from the coconut milk, and a little heat from the curry powder.  I will definitely be making this soup again, and next time I'm going to try replacing the curry powder with a little harissa - I think the flavours would be great with the carrots and tomatoes, and the kick of heat won't go astray either.  Hey, and guess what ...  I also discovered that my roasted red tomatoes didn't detract from the gorgeous colour one little bit, it's still the colour of marigolds.  What do you think?

Curried Coconut, Lentil & Tomato Soup 2.jpg

Curried Carrot, Lentil & Roasted Tomato Soup Recipe
Inspired by recipe by Nigel Slater
from Tender, Vol. I
Click here for a printable copy of this recipe

1 tablespoon olive oil
450g carrots
2x sticks celery
flaky sea salt
450g slow-roasted tomatoes
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 cup red lentils
1 tin coconut milk
4 cups water

Finely chop the carrots & celery - I blitzed them up in the food processor until very finely chopped.  

Heat olive oil in a heavy based pan over medium heat.  Add carrots and celery, sprinkle with a generous pinch of flaky sea salt, and cook (stirring from time to time) until the vegetables have softened and started to release some of their liquid.

Add the tomatoes and curry powder, and continue stirring for a couple of minutes.

Add the lentils, coconut milk, and water.  Stir to combine.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, and simmer gently for 30-40 minutes, until the vegetables and lentils are completely soft.   It thickens up a lot as it cooks, so feel free to add more water as necessary.

Use a stick blender to blitz to a puree (or pour into a conventional blender).  Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.  Serve.

If you would like to get to know Nigel Slater a little better, and to see all the other budget friendly dishes that are on the menu this week, then do go and visit my friends at I Heart Cooking Clubs and check out the links ...


... or check out Tender, Vol. 1 and Nigel's many other great titles available from Amazon USA, Amazon UK, or Fishpond NZ.

I'll also be sharing this post this week at See Ya In the Gumbo hosted by the delightful Michelle at Ms. enPlace, at Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays hosted by my lovely friend Deb at Kahakai Kitchen, at Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads, at Foodie Fridays hosted by Designs by Gollum, and at Cook Your Books hosted by the lovely Joyce at Kitchen Flavours.

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